ANZAC DAY: Thoughts on sacrifice made

YOUNG people wanted to offer their perspective about the sacrifices made in war at yesterday’s Mount Beauty Anzac Day service.

More than 300 people lined the streets where those marching offered their respect for those who fought in war.

They rounded the cenotaph to a service where hymns were interrupted by applause when a 1942 North American Harvard plane, which had flown with the New Zealand airforce, passed overhead.

Among those who laid wreaths at the service was Alpine Council mayor Peter Roper and Ken Bell, of the Mount Beauty Rotary Club.

The ceremony was led by RSL Mount Beauty sub-branch president Bob Williams.

Mount Beauty Secondary College captains Jade Flint and Tom McMahon offered Diggers some insight into how they viewed the sacrifice.

“We are so far from when it happened and we want to express what it means to us,” Jade said.

“We want to show we do care.”

Jade said Anzac Day wasn’t just about the men and women who went to war.

“It’s also about those who were left behind and the hardships they went through,” she said.

“We have to remember there were men who left and never returned the same.

“The effects of war don’t go away just because the war ended.”

Captain Cameron Els-ton, from the Bandiana Army Logistics Training Centre, spoke about the importance of handing down the Anzac Day tradition to future generations.

“It’s about remembering sacrifices and the proud tradition they have set,” he said.

“I am exceptionally proud to be part of the army and carrying on the tradition.”

Captain Elston said the Anzacs showed courage and dedication to their mates.

“You can’t beat that,” he said.

Captain Elston said nobody would ever comprehend the severity of war.

“Unless you’ve been there you just don’t know,” he said.

“About 2000 people died in just one day.”

He said he was “exceptionally” proud to be part of the Australian Army.

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