Lake Hume pines reach the end of their useful life

All the pine trees at the The Pines reserve on Lake Hume, near Bethanga Bridge, have been removed. Picture: PETER MERKESTEYN

All the pine trees at the The Pines reserve on Lake Hume, near Bethanga Bridge, have been removed. Picture: PETER MERKESTEYN

PINE trees planted almost 70 years ago on the banks of Lake Hume have been chopped down.

The tallest trees, which were planted as part of a forestry school project in the 1940s, stood more than 10 metres high.

Albury Council’s vegetation manager Steve Onley said some of the trees had reached the end of their useful life, with some showing signs of distress from the drought and a tornado that ripped through the Bethanga area three years ago.

“It is all about the public risk,” Mr Onley said.

“They are at the end of their life expectancy and some have become quite dangerous.

“A lot of them have decayed and were essentially going to fall.

“They had the potential to kill someone.”

Radiata pines have been removed near the Bethanga Bridge and Lake Hume Resort.

A middle section which includes lemon scented and spotted gums will remain and the pines will be replaced by other native species.

The re-vegetation project will start with school tree planting days in conjunction with Planet Ark between July 22-24, with Albury and James Fallon high schools and Wewak Street School already signing up to take part.

A community tree planting day is scheduled for August 3.

The replacement tree planting will start near the toilet block in the area known as The Pines.

The toilet block and boat ramp are also earmarked for upgrades.

Mr Onley said the area was a known habitat for squirrel gliders.

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