Rules aside, Daniel Walther claims his freedom

Daniel Walther with 2D artworks he painted from the shadows formed when light reflected through his geometric structures. Picture: MATTHEW SMITHWICK

Daniel Walther with 2D artworks he painted from the shadows formed when light reflected through his geometric structures. Picture: MATTHEW SMITHWICK

DANIEL Walther’s studies were confined by rules and restrictions, but given the freedom to create what he wanted, he has found his options limitless.

His first art exhibition on the Border, dpw 20, is a bold and complex look into how metals shape and evolve on their own.

Walther studies building design at Wodonga TAFE.

“It is very methodical and precise but this art is the opposite,” he said.

“It’s free.”

More than 30 3D geometric art works can be found in the exhibition, accompanied by more than 20 2D art works.

“I don’t design them mathematically, the shapes are produced moment to moment,” Walther said.

His work comes from his interest in strong linear forms and bright monochrome colours.

Walther said he didn’t title his works because he didn’t want to alter people’s perspectives.

“I don’t want to influence people to see the work in a certain way,” he said.

“People choose what they see.”

Walther said there was more to his pieces than how they looked.

“You could do a whole exhibition just on one structure,” he said.

“I paint the shadows formed when the light is reflected through it.”

The exhibition, which opened at Arts Space Wodonga last night, will close on May 24.

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