WIRES: Like any good parent, you need time and patience

For Kerry Hutchinson, “playing possum” has meant rearing her two motherless babies, brought to WIRES at Christmas. Picture: JOHN RUSSELL

For Kerry Hutchinson, “playing possum” has meant rearing her two motherless babies, brought to WIRES at Christmas. Picture: JOHN RUSSELL

HAVE you the patience and commitment to care for orphaned and injured native animals?

If you do, a training course at Wonga Wetlands on June 14-15 by WIRES — Wildlife Information Rescue and Education Service — is for you.

Albury’s Kerry Hutchinson, who has been with the organisation for four years, said the work was rewarding.

“I have been caring for two possums since Christmas. They came to us as babies,” she said.

“We care for them until they have finished drinking their milk because they are dependent on it.”

The mother of one of the possums was killed on the road and the baby was found in the pouch.

“The wildlife workers are unsure how the other possum lost its mother.

Mrs Hutchinson said it took commitment and patience to become a carer.

“A very young possum has to be fed five times a day,” she said.

“If people are looking after an injured animal, they may have to administer medicine throughout the day.

“We need volunteers who are at home with the time to do this.”

Those interested in the two-day course can sign on by phoning 0427 493 716.

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