HOTHOUSE THEATRE's 1984: When hate is the way of life

Bryan Probets plays Winston Smith in George Orwell’s classic 1984. Picture: TARA GOONAN

Bryan Probets plays Winston Smith in George Orwell’s classic 1984. Picture: TARA GOONAN

A WORLD where your every move is watched and love doesn’t exist was on show on the Butter Factory Theatre stage last night.

In 1948, George Orwell wrote 1984, a story based on his perceptions of the future.

The story has been adapted by Shake & Stir Theatre Co and Wodonga is the first Victorian stop on the company’s national tour.

Actor Bryan Probets plays Winston Smith, a man who works at the Ministry of Truth, rewriting history to suit the needs of the “Party”, led by Big Brother.

Winston discovers the past wasn’t always dictated by the “Party” which leads to a series of torturous events.

The play is set in a world where society is under surveillance 24 hours a day.

“George Orwell’s predictions weren’t far off,” Probets said.

“Our movements are watched and this story makes you question how much freedom you get.”

Love is also forbidden and, once Winston gets involved with a woman named Julia, the “Party” is quick to try to eradicate the problem.

“At first Winston thinks he might be insane but when he meets Julia he realises he is human,” Probets said.

“The scenes are shocking. We do it true to the spirit of the book.”

Probets said the most frightening aspect of play was that the “Party” was not built on love, but on hate.

1984 will be staged by HotHouse Theatre at the Butter Factory Theatre until May 24.

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