There’s power in gas and trash

Albury mayor Kevin Mack and LMS Energy chief executive John Falzon open a new technology at Albury tip which will turn landfill gases into electricity. Picture: JOHN RUSSELL

Albury mayor Kevin Mack and LMS Energy chief executive John Falzon open a new technology at Albury tip which will turn landfill gases into electricity. Picture: JOHN RUSSELL

ONE person’s trash is set to be 1200 people’s electricity.

A new $3 million technology at Albury tip, which will see methane and other harmful landfill gases converted into electricity, was officially opened yesterday by mayor Kevin Mack.

The gases extracted from the tip on Mudge Street in Lavington will significantly decrease Albury’s carbon footprint.

The gases are transported to the plant where they power a generator that converts them to electricity.

“We are being asked to think globally and act locally,” Cr Mack said.

The plant will stop 46,800 tonnes of gases from polluting the air each year, the equivalent of about 46,000 hot air balloons.

Cr Mack said the plant showed the city was managing waste more effectively.

“It is a significant step in the right direction for us and the other shires this service will cater to,” he said.

The plant, one of 50 in the country, will feed the NSW electricity grid.

“It’s a great initiative and a model I hope will become standard practice in facilities Australia-wide,” Cr Mack said.

LMS Energy chief executive John Falzon said the new technology was better than wind and solar power systems.

“We are supporters of any renewable energy but this actually takes the pollution out of the atmosphere,” he said.

LMS Energy was the first company to create and trade carbon credits from landfill gas in Australia.

Already the Albury Landfill Gas Project has been issued with 24,328 Australian Carbon Credit Units under the Carbon Farming Initiative.

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