New car rules get Baker tick

Martin Baker with an electric-hybrid Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, which has a rated fuel usage of 1.9 litres for every 100 kilometres, The Albury-Wodonga dealer supports proposed cheaper registration costs for safer and greener passenger vehicles. Picture: DAVID THORPE

Martin Baker with an electric-hybrid Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, which has a rated fuel usage of 1.9 litres for every 100 kilometres, The Albury-Wodonga dealer supports proposed cheaper registration costs for safer and greener passenger vehicles. Picture: DAVID THORPE

CAR dealer Martin Baker yesterday welcomed proposed cheaper NSW registration fees for safer and greener vehicles.

The NSW government has called for public submissions on several changes being put forward.

Transport for NSW wants to shift the registration charge for passenger vehicles from one based solely on weight to one that also includes vehicle safety and environmental criteria.

Martin Baker, who owns Baker Motors with his four brothers, said the move had much merit and made a lot of sense.

“I’d certainly welcome anything that gets people into safer and cleaner cars,” he said.

Mr Baker said most new cars now came with five-star ratings under the Australasian New Car Assessment Program safety ratings system.

The commercial vehicle class was one of few exceptions.

Member for Albury Greg Aplin said the proposals represented the biggest change to light vehicle registration in NSW in 90 years.

Cheaper registration would give people the incentive to pick a safer, cleaner model.

Mr Baker said an example of the kind of green technology now available was the Mitsubishi electric-hybrid the Outlander PHEV, which had the lowest fuel consumption he had ever come across.

“It’s rated at using 1.9 litres for every 100 kilometres,” he said.

Mr Baker said fuel economy ratings had dropped “incredibly” since it first became an issue for car buyers about 15 years ago.

“It never used to be a factor when people were looking at cars, but now it is,” he said.

The government’s proposals are initially for new passenger vehicles only, with reforms to secondhand vehicles believed to be several years away.

The idea is that will give people adequate time to plan ahead.

Mr Baker said it was likely that discounted registration fees for safer and greener cars could motivate more people to save the money needed for a new car, rather than opting for a later-model secondhand car.

People can provide feedback until July 24.

The new registration pricing model would apply to all new cars, with flow-on effects to motorcycles, caravans and light trailers.

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