Trinity tops the class in science

Founders Adrian Farrer, representing his father Bishop David Farrer, Professor David Mitchell, Patricia Gould and Keith Currie watch college captains Christiaan Slabbert, 18 and Laura Thomas, 17 (centre front) perform a science experiment in one of the centre’s new labs. Picture: MATTHEW SMITHWICK

Founders Adrian Farrer, representing his father Bishop David Farrer, Professor David Mitchell, Patricia Gould and Keith Currie watch college captains Christiaan Slabbert, 18 and Laura Thomas, 17 (centre front) perform a science experiment in one of the centre’s new labs. Picture: MATTHEW SMITHWICK

A state-of-the-art science centre at Trinity College named after the school’s founders was opened yesterday.

The Founders’ Centre at the Thurgoona campus, valued at $1.8 million, features four laboratories for physics, biology, chemistry and general science and an outdoor environmental science area.

The centre was funded through a $700,000 Australian government grant and a $1.1 million contribution from the school’s community.

After an opening ceremony attended by teachers, students and founders, member for Farrer Sussan Ley unveiled a plaque at the building.

“It’s incredibly valuable,” Ms Ley said.

“There are not enough students doing science, becoming interested in science and graduating through the science disciplines.

“That applies particularly to girls and I’d love to see more girls studying science and by ext-ension engineering and maths.”

Ms Ley said the school had surpassed what the founders’ had imagined for the school.

Founder and former principal Keith Currie said it was staggering to see the school’s progress.

“The hardest thing is to take something and make it go further, make it better, but that’s what they’ve done now,” he said.

“We need more scientists and the scientists have to be taught in science labs by qualified science teachers.”

Principal Steven O’Connor said the centre would benefit students enormously.

“It was a much-needed resource to cater for the growth the college has experienced over the past few years,” he said.

“It will enable us to teach mainstream science to our students in the senior school in very, very outstanding facilities.”

College captain Year 12 student Christiaan Slabbert, 18, said the centre, in use since the beginning of the year, was more fun to use.

“The new facility allows us to do more things, better things — it’s exciting,” he said.

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