Children caretake culture for future

Mase Murray, 6, celebrates the beginning of NAIDOC Week with his grandmother Valda Murray and other youngsters at Woodland Grove in Wodonga yesterday. Picture: MATTHEW SMITHWICK

Mase Murray, 6, celebrates the beginning of NAIDOC Week with his grandmother Valda Murray and other youngsters at Woodland Grove in Wodonga yesterday. Picture: MATTHEW SMITHWICK

IT is up to future generations to keep Aboriginal culture alive.

That is why youngsters have been encouraged to immerse themselves in NAIDOC Week celebrations to better understand their history.

Charlotte Murray, 9, said NAIDOC Week was about honouring the indigenous community and acknowledging the positive contributions it had made.

“We must remember all the Aborigines and the stolen generations,” she said.

“It’s important young people are involved in celebrations so we can tell the next generation of children what really happened.”

NAIDOC Week started in Wodonga yesterday with a flag raising at Mungabareena Aboriginal Corporation before a celebration in Woodland Grove.

In the crowd were a number of youngsters learning from their Aboriginal elders.

Albury-Wodonga NAIDOC Week committee chairman John Murray, said even though the children did not fully understand their history, they were learning the importance of building relationships.

“This week is about the kids,” he said.

“They see it as fun now but when they get older they will understand the importance of it.”

Albury police also joined in NAIDOC Week celebrations yesterday with a morning tea at Woomera Aboriginal Corporation.

Mr Murray encouraged everybody to attend NAIDOC Week events as it strengthened reconciliation.

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