Close the Gap Day 2017 marked in Wodonga

The close the gap initiative to halve the gap in year 12 attainment by 2020 is the only target on track, but it’s one Border advocates on the ground are seeing work.

Mungabareena Aboriginal Corporation chief executive Caine Raudino said it was a local achievement too.

LOOK AHEAD: AWAS and MAC chief executives David Noonan and Caine Raudino at a close the gap joint event with Murray Primary Health Network. Picture: MARK JESSER

LOOK AHEAD: AWAS and MAC chief executives David Noonan and Caine Raudino at a close the gap joint event with Murray Primary Health Network. Picture: MARK JESSER

“I think a big focus of our community is to ensure our kids are well educated to get people on boards and give them a voice,” he said.

“Getting kids through the system ... that shows me we’re doing something right.

“It’s alarming to say we haven’t met six of seven targets.

“To me, they are achievable, but only if we are self-sustainable.

“The (Murray) Primary Health Network are now releasing Aboriginal-funded money to Aboriginal organisations because they know what to do best with that money.”

Albury Wodonga Aboriginal Health Service chief executive David Noonan echoed the need for more autonomy.

“The community owns very closely NAIDOC Week and apology day, they need to have the same level of buy-in to closing the gap … once that happens, it will go beyond measure,” he said.

“Non-Aboriginal organisations need to start taking ownership and start taking a really firm look at how they’re providing services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and start to take their relationship with them seriously in terms of engagement.”

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop