Innovation | Change has consequences, good and bad

Each Matrix Thinking diagram carries a bold banner called “Consequential Change”. This asks you to think about the consequences of your innovation.

The A380 Airbus would probably rank as one of the boldest ever innovations. To even contemplate this was breathtaking.

The consequence of introducing the A380 was the need for runways and taxiways at all major hubs worldwide to be upgraded and all terminal building to have a second loading deck.

The risk of this being a disaster were vast as the redevelopment costs at all major airports was immense. Fortunately, the A380 is an outstanding success.

When Apple introduced the smartphone they virtually killed their market for iPods.

However, they clearly had thought about this and so innovated the standard iPod by introducing the Nano.

Innovation: The consequence of introducing the A380 was the need for runways and taxiways at all major hubs worldwide to be upgraded and all terminal building to have a second loading deck.

Innovation: The consequence of introducing the A380 was the need for runways and taxiways at all major hubs worldwide to be upgraded and all terminal building to have a second loading deck.

How about Wine labels?

Recently an Australian company introduced a thermo-chromatic label for red wines, the idea being that the label colour would indicate the ideal drinking temperature.

How about locks?

We worked with an innovator with the “perfect” lock that the user could re-key themselves in seconds for less than one dollar. When presented with this, understandably lock companies were less than enthusiastic. Such a lock bypassed locksmiths, one of their major routes to market. The last thing we should do is threaten our channel.

What’s the message?

Innovation needs to be developed with the market consequences in mind, the upside being if you can threaten a major player with your innovation, there is a good chance you will be bought out in very short order for great financial gain.