Musicians Lachlan Mitchell and Maidie Dawson head to the UK as part of new exchange program

JOURNEY: Musicians Maidie Dawson, from Kergunyah and Lachlan Mitchell from Jindera are on their way to the UK. Picture: MARK JESSER

JOURNEY: Musicians Maidie Dawson, from Kergunyah and Lachlan Mitchell from Jindera are on their way to the UK. Picture: MARK JESSER

Visiting the Glastonbury music festival site will be like “walking in the shoes of the Rolling Stones” for 22-year-old Maidie Dawson.

The Kergunyah musician, along with Jindera’s Lachlan Mitchell, are en route to the United Kingdom as part of the inaugural exchange program between Dreamfields and the Somerset Rural Youth Project.

Dawson, a country folk musician, said visiting the Glastonbury site and meeting founder Michael Eavis would be a highlight.

“It’s one of the biggest and most renowned festivals in the world,” she said.

“By going there, you’re walking in the shoes of all the well-known artists that performed, and it will be a honour meeting the person who started it.

“It will be a big eye-opener, seeing what opportunities there are out there.”

Dawson said it was a great opportunity, following on the 2016 Henty Machinery Field Days where she headlined with Mitchell.

“I did the Dreamfields program in 2011 and 2012 with Craig and that’s how I ended up releasing an EP in 2013,” she said.

“Without Dreamfields, I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

Dreamfields convener Craig Dent said the exchange, supported by the Australian Cultural Fund, was a first.

“The idea is Maidie and Lachlan will do this and Somerset will hopefully send two young people over as well and they will perform at the Henty Machinery Field Days and the Dreamfields Festival,” he said.

“They will tour the region in a shared rural experience between the Border community and Somerset.

“There are three creative streams to the Dreamfields Awards, so next year the exchange will be open to young musicians, photographs and creative writers participating in workshops.”

Mitchell, who just completed his first blues-rock album Lock Key, said he was looking forward to experiencing a different music scene.

“We are playing at schools and recording at the studio they have for the Somerset Youth Project,” he said.

“It will be interesting to see what they are doing and how I can learn from it.”

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