On the Wallaby, July 15

INTERESTING: By choosing to purchase the troubled Heyfield sawmill, is the Victorian government simply trying to do the right thing, or is it merely pandering to a loud union?
Picture: Joe Armao

INTERESTING: By choosing to purchase the troubled Heyfield sawmill, is the Victorian government simply trying to do the right thing, or is it merely pandering to a loud union? Picture: Joe Armao

Exciting times ahead for Victoria – the government is exploring the way ahead to buy a sawmill.

Not just any old sawmill, but the largest hardwood plant in the nation, based at Heyfield.

Another brilliant idea is that about 200 employees would become public servants. No doubt about it, Premier Dan is the man.

To think that 200 loyal union members could have a job for life and every Victorian will be part of a plan to return the sawmill to profitability. It is a pity that the Premier did not see the golden path ahead and didn’t snap up the Holden, Ford and Toyota plants. Maybe even a dairy factory or two. He will surely be able to put in an offer for the struggling Portland aluminium smelter.

Rip money away from roads and hospitals and buy struggling businesses.

What a bold plan, or maybe he is only postulating to a yapping union as he has done with CFA.

A butcher in Queensland is bemoaning the fact that his business, The Squealing Pig, is being targeted by activists.

He has to be joking. Most people would find the name confronting, and given there would be so many other names with a warm fuzzy feeling that he could use.

Just imagine a baby goods shop called Sobbing Baby. He should note that many years ago, it was the meat board who asked butchers shops to remove depictions of lambs and calves from their walls. Try and find a photo of a lamb, pig or steer in a supermarket. For what it is worth, Higgledy Piggledy has a nice sound.  If the butcher in question was seeking publicity , it has worked. 

The current spat over a Strathbogie Shire farmer removing vegetation along a roadside fence line needs to be resolved with a clear outcome.

Roadside boundary fences are the most critical fences on a property.

Not only do they contain animals as part of farm operation, but more importantly they prevent stock from wandering along roads, which can result in vehicle collisions and the subsequent loss of life.

Many farmers, those with frontages to highways in particular, are on constant watch that cattle and sheep remain contained. The biggest problems are gates being left open and trees falling across fences.

If local governments want to take a strong stance, then maybe they could contribute to the cost of fencing.

Also, the question needs to be asked does this four-metre clearance come into play when the neighbour is other Crown land, such as state and national parks. This has certainly been a bugbear for land owners in the past.

Let us hope wisdom comes into play in the Strathbogie case.

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