Nimbee opening horizons for Tegan Allen

Advertising Feature – International Day of People with Disability

Tegan Allen at her farm in Everton. An optic nerve irreversibly damaged by a brain tumour at aged 13 meant a new path for this inspirational young lady.

Tegan Allen at her farm in Everton. An optic nerve irreversibly damaged by a brain tumour at aged 13 meant a new path for this inspirational young lady.

I couldn’t do what I’m doing today without Nimbee. She gives me independence, safety and companionship, and opened new horizons.

Tegan Allen

International Day for People With Disability is about celebrating ability and removing the barriers to participation for everyone.

Everton’s Tegan Allen, 22, is a great example of someone who uses her abilities to help remove barriers for others.

She had her optic nerve irreversibly damaged by a brain tumour at aged 13 and needed orientation and mobility training with a cane to help her navigate her environment, and get to and from school.

Angela Reynolds, Guide Dogs Victoria’s locally-based Wangaratta orientation and mobility practitioner was straight on hand to help.

“We work wherever clients need us – home, school, work,” said Angela.

“People need to be trained and feel confident in their community, it really helps that I live locally and know the area well.”

Tegan also attended group programs, where she met other teenagers with similar experiences to her own.

“Losing sight at 13 really affected me socially,” she said.

“Most of my friends could not cope with me going blind.

“The friends I met at Guide Dogs Victoria helped me keep going.”

Partners: Tegan has learnt to rely on Nimbee, who has provided a new level of independence for the 22 year-old and helped her to pursue a career in helping others.

Partners: Tegan has learnt to rely on Nimbee, who has provided a new level of independence for the 22 year-old and helped her to pursue a career in helping others.

This advertising feature is supported by the following businesses:

This modern young woman has inspiring ambition, pursuing a career helping other young people with disability.

She has been working to support disabled youth for the Rural City of Wangaratta, including helping organise an all access film festival in Wangaratta today (Friday December 1) from 1pm to 3pm.

The extra travel and commitments meant Tegan had to learn to rely on Guide Dog Nimbee.

“I couldn’t do what I’m doing today without Nimbee,” she said.

“She gives me independence, safety and companionship, and opened new horizons.

“Working with Wangaratta Council has given me so much experience, and I really want to continue to help others into the future.”

If you, or someone you know, is affected by vision loss and needs support with daily skills or getting out and about, you can contact your local Guide Dogs team by calling 1800 804 805.