It is time for a change of preference?

Advertising feature – Change of Preference

Once you receive your ATAR in December, you have a limited time to change your course preferences. This is a great opportunity to make sure you give yourself the best chance of getting your dream course. Read about some of the options available to you in this article.

Wodonga TAFE's Justine Rofe with diploma2degree students who received Latrobe Uni   Excellence Awards this year; Isabel Francioli, Megan Murtagh and Frances Dallinger.

Wodonga TAFE's Justine Rofe with diploma2degree students who received Latrobe Uni Excellence Awards this year; Isabel Francioli, Megan Murtagh and Frances Dallinger.

This pathway could lead to your success

Your dream career may be just around the corner with a TAFE to uni pathway with Wodonga TAFE.  

Justine Rofe, Wodonga TAFE’s senior educator, higher education, said there were more than 50 options open to turn your TAFE studies into a degree.

“We will help you discover where your talents lie and build your knowledge and skills in the subject areas you are most passionate about,” she said.

Taking a diploma to degree option gives you an education and career pathway that offers you entry and exit points, so you can study and then enter the workforce with real vocational experience and work-ready skills and choose the educational pathway that is right for you.

“Our university partnerships enable you to receive credit towards a university degree for the studies you have completed at Wodonga TAFE,” said Justine.

“If you are interested in a career in early childhood, nursing, or community services, then our ‘diploma2degree’ programs with La Trobe University are perfect for you. These programs provide you with the unique opportunity to study your diploma and degree in one package.

“This innovative program provides students with support to progress to university study, and also guarantees* them a place in the corresponding degree at La Trobe University.”  

Note: *Students transitioning to the Bachelor of Nursing are required to complete a transition subject.

Read more about Wodonga TAFE here

Flexibility and support at AWCC

For Albury Wodonga Community College student Sarah Smith, a high level of support and flexibility were the keys to her success in starting her career in aged care.

For Albury Wodonga Community College student Sarah Smith, a high level of support and flexibility were the keys to her success in starting her career in aged care.

Sarah Smith has found her calling. After completing her work placement at a local aged care facility, the Albury Wodonga Community College (AWCC) student knows exactly which industry she wants to work in. 

“I loved placement. I feel like it gave me a lot of confidence. The feedback was amazing. I got lots of personal satisfaction and made a lot of connections with the residents.”

Sarah’s passion is evident. Even though her placement finished weeks ago, she has returned to the facility several times. “It was really good. I actually decided to volunteer, because I enjoyed it so much!

“I felt like where I did my placement were very flexible,’ said Sarah.

“Considering I have a job and I have two kids and all the rest of it – they worked with me. It was very good. I tried studying at uni, and I didn’t quite get the support I needed. So I feel like the support here had a great deal to do with my success of actually finishing the course.”

VET Coordinator Kylie Streltschenko says the Community College has strong industry partnerships. “All the facilities we sent the class to this semester were just fantastic.”

She said trainers are dedicated to preparing students for the industry. “They want you to achieve your best. Our trainers draw that side out of people, because it is a fast paced industry. It’s high pressure, especially when you get up into those higher roles.”

Enrolments for Semester 1, 2018 are now open.

Read more about AWCC here

Melbourne model makes a great mark

WELL SUITED: Charlotte Smith, who studied a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Teaching, says the Melbourne Model meets the needs to contemporary university students.

WELL SUITED: Charlotte Smith, who studied a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Teaching, says the Melbourne Model meets the needs to contemporary university students.

The Melbourne Model is a distinctive curriculum that gives students a wider understanding of the world beyond their degree. 

With a breadth and depth of knowledge gained while studying, graduate employability is ranked No. 7 globally*, meaning students are prepared for every possible future. 

The six core undergraduate degrees (Arts, Biomedicine, Commerce, Design, Music or Science) offer students a choice from over 100 majors. Students can then head straight into their career, or continue on for graduate study with more than 270 degrees to choose from.

So how is the Australia first model looking ten years on since its inception?

“I believe the Melbourne Model meets the needs to contemporary university students – our future careers are not set in stone, so why should our degrees not have the flexibility to explore other fields of study?” says Charlotte Smith, who studied a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Teaching via the Melbourne Model.

The Melbourne Model connects students with each other, the community and the wider world. 

There are a range of opportunities to engage with organisations, through internships, applied research projects and overseas study programs. The University of Melbourne is ranked No. 32 in the world and No. 1 in Australia^, with 93 per cent of graduates employed within four months of graduating#. 

Each year more than 250 Australian and international organisations – including IBM, KPMG and PwC – visit campus to entice our students with graduate job opportunities.

Today's workplace demands forward-thinking graduates who are skilled and resilient, with a broad outlook and collaborative approach. This is what the Melbourne Model delivers.

Find out more about choosing the right degree at www.cop.unimelb.edu.au and visit the Parkville campus at Course Information Day, Monday December 18, 10am-2.30pm.

^Times Higher Education World University Rankings, 2018

*QS World University Rankings, 2018

#Graduate Destination Survey, 2016

La Trobe options on pointe

STUDYING THE CLASSICS: La Trobe University physiotherapy students Madeleine Hook and Brad Smith observe artist Benedicte Bemet of The Australian Ballet.

STUDYING THE CLASSICS: La Trobe University physiotherapy students Madeleine Hook and Brad Smith observe artist Benedicte Bemet of The Australian Ballet.

Love the arts but not an artist? Luckily, a career in the arts isn’t limited to being in the limelight. Behind the scenes, a dedicated team of experts bring shows to life through roles in marketing, external relations, finance, IT and specialised medical support.

Take The Australian Ballet, for example. Their in-house medical team of physiotherapists, myotherapists, sports doctors and body conditioning specialists supports a national company of elite dancers to achieve their best performance, season after season.

La Trobe University physiotherapy students Brad Smith and Madeleine Hook took an exclusive five-week placement with The Australian Ballet to discover how medical expertise plays a pivotal role in bringing first-class ballet to audiences across Australia. 

For Brad and Madeleine, a placement with The Australian Ballet was refreshing in its variety. Some days they’d observe the company’s physiotherapists, or sit in on coaching classes for dancers in rehab. Other days they’d train in manual handling and spend time in the gym with body conditioning specialists. “We’re taking everything we’ve learnt at university and we’re building on it in an elite sporting environment,” Madeleine says.

Observing world leaders in physiotherapy and body conditioning educate Australia’s best dancers was a highlight for Brad. “Working with elite physiotherapists has given me a chance to understand what 20 years of experience gives to your clinical management and reasoning. Being able to really understand what’s going through their head when they see a patient is an invaluable experience that’s changed the way I approach clinical practice.”

Brad and Madeleine’s placement is one of several on offer as part of La Trobe’s unique research and learning partnership with The Australian Ballet. The partnership pairs La Trobe’s human movement and sport scientists with The Australian Ballet’s injury prevention and rehabilitation team to examine the athletic capacity of leading ballet dancers.

“As a student I’m really lucky to have this opportunity. There aren’t too many placements where you get to work with elite athletes who have to push their bodies in such an extreme way,” says Madeleine. 

For Brad, gaining hands-on experience with The Australian Ballet has given him high-level skills with broad appeal. It’s also helped him confirm his career path.