Albury monumental mason Vic Brosolo has died at the age of 81 after a career which saw his work reflected in cemeteries, buildings and memorials

FROM hundreds of graves to war memorials to Albury's old courthouse - Vic Brosolo left his mark across the Border.

Master craftstman: Vic Brosolo works on marble at his Mate Street business in 1999. He died this week at the age of 81.

Master craftstman: Vic Brosolo works on marble at his Mate Street business in 1999. He died this week at the age of 81.

But the monumental mason's lasting legacy for his son Paul, the third generation in the family business, was not tangible.

His father was a perfectionist and dad was brought up the same way

Paul Brosolo on his father monumental mason Vic

“His father was a perfectionist and dad was brought up the same way,” Paul Brosolo said.

“He said anything out by five mil I want you want to fix it, that's what he was like.

“A lady came in one day and said 'you made a mistake on lettering on a headstone'. 

“He said I can't remember that and she said 'it was 20 years ago'.

“He asked 'what the mistake?' and she said 'you left out a full stop', so he said he would fix it and he went out and corrected it.”

Vic Brosolo died on Monday aged, 81, at Mercy Place in Albury after having suffered dementia.

As a 20-year-old, he followed his father Vic Brosolo senior into the business which has been in Mate Street, North Albury since 1930.

Pigeon fancier: Vic Brosolo with some of his homing birds which he kept at his property and flew regularly.

Pigeon fancier: Vic Brosolo with some of his homing birds which he kept at his property and flew regularly.

“It's hard working for your father as your head is filled with ideas, but he doesn't want to do it your way," Mr Brosolo told The Border Mail in 1999.

Among his most notable jobs was restoration work on Dean Street's 1860 courthouse and Kia Ora, the former 19th century bank in Albury's Townsend Street.

Mr Brosolo also worked on war memorials for Howlong, Tallangatta and Yackandandah as well creating granite flower beds in Wodonga's Woodland Grove.

Paul Brosolo, the youngest of four sons and the only one to pursue the trade, said his father would now have his own monument.

Patriotic assistance: Vic Brosolo in 2004 during preparations for stonework that would be incorporated in a roll of honour at Yackandandah.

Patriotic assistance: Vic Brosolo in 2004 during preparations for stonework that would be incorporated in a roll of honour at Yackandandah.

“He didn't want to be fussed over with a grave site, but because he's a monumental mason I will do something up to make sure he stands out,” Mr Brosolo said.

Away from work, Vic Brosolo was involved in Albury's homing pigeon club for 60 years and bike racing and lawn bowls.

Paul also said his father once found $1200 in cash and $800 in cheques on the side of the road and made sure it was returned to its owner with a $50 reward.

“You couldn’t find a more honest bloke,” Paul said.

Vic Brosolo is survived by his wife Monica, who he married on June 4, 1962, sons Chris, Jono, Edward and Paul and six grandchildren.

His funeral will be held at Albury's St Patrick's Catholic Church from 10.30am this Friday.