Are you hitting the water this weekend? | Fishing

Gidday fishos, I’m back for a couple of weeks as Russ carries out a little bit of product development over on the South Coast. 

WHAT A CATCH: Brian Hickman and Raymond Thake with the nice Murray cod they caught near the Kremur Street Boat Ramp.

WHAT A CATCH: Brian Hickman and Raymond Thake with the nice Murray cod they caught near the Kremur Street Boat Ramp.

He is over there chasing classic estuary species such as flatties, bream, toadies and will spend a day on the bass in Brogo Lake. No doubt on return the tales of his exploits will grace a future fishing column.

Last weekend I spent a leisurely Saturday tossing around lures in the Lake of a Thousand Casts, which is better known as Lake Mulwala, checking out the new Mega Pompadours.

These new Jackall Lures required a different approach than what is the norm down there and I had to beef up the tackle I took down. 

Now, I always take two other combos down there and while I was setting this one up I realised that if I did, I would no longer be compliant to the law as you’re only allowed two set up rods.

So not wanting to incur the wrath of a fisheries officer I left the outfit as it was, without a lure on it, then wondered what role fisheries officers carried out on a daily basis. 

Fisheries officers have an important job in protecting our fisheries, but they often come under fire from the public and are perceived as being harsh, however, they are just doing their job.

These officers have the power to stop and inspect any vehicle or vessel, ask for your name and address and search any equipment. They will count and measure your catch and assess the likelihood that your fishing gear could be illegal. 

If you are doing the right thing you really don’t have anything to worry about and I’m sure the officer will give you some good information about fishing there.

If you don’t, well you’re in trouble and these officers will explain the offence you have committed, request your full name and address and invite you to participate in an interview if required. 

They can seize any fish, property and documents and this means your boat and vehicle, not just your fishing gear.

Some states also allow fisheries officers to enforce compliance in several other areas as well, these include littering, animal cruelty and boating safety issues. 

Most offences are not that severe and if you don’t get carried away arguing or becoming belligerent with them, they may only issue you with an official verbal warning. So just keep your cool, as they are only doing what is right for our fishery.

There is a hotline set up in both states to report illegal activity, and if you see something odd or just simply wrong, don’t hesitate to call them on 133 474 for Victoria and for NSW on the Department of Primary Industry web page.

Lake Hume is still continuing to fire, with good reddies mixed with the odd cod or yella being taken on all methods. 

Cliff trolled a couple of good fish last weekend on McGrath Widebody divers - a good-sized cod and yella. Yabbies are still the best bait, but by adding a plastic above the bait you’re increasing your opportunity to catch them.

Lake Mulwala: Fishing reasonably well during the past week, with many reports of undersized and the odd legal cod being trolled up on hardbodies or spinner baits.

Tossing surface lures, wake baits or divers have also been effective, however, the growing weed problem hasn’t made things all that easy down there. The deeper channels and the water around Hogans Ramp are probably the most consistent areas to try.

HOOKED: Jasmine Morunga shows off the yellowbelly she caught in the Murray River at Albury.

HOOKED: Jasmine Morunga shows off the yellowbelly she caught in the Murray River at Albury.

Blowering: The dam has gone off the boil, as a few local Albury anglers failed to get anything decent with just a few smallish reddies caught between five different parties. The lake is falling rapidly which could be making life difficult for anglers. However, it is amazing the difference a week makes up there.

The river from the wall to Corowa is fishing okay although the water flow has a tendency to be up and down.

RELEASED: Connor Heir with the 79cm cod he caught and released at Mulwala/ Yarrawonga off the top on a Thirstyfurra Rat surface lure.

RELEASED: Connor Heir with the 79cm cod he caught and released at Mulwala/ Yarrawonga off the top on a Thirstyfurra Rat surface lure.

A boat makes life a little easier when fishing this water, yet many anglers have had success fishing from the bank around Mungabereena.