Trout stream season nears end

YOU BEAUTY: Keen young angler Archie and his dad, Dave Donnelly walked the Kiewa River at Mt Beauty recently, with Archie landing this ripper on a gold vibrax. It measured 45cm and was in good condition. It was released.

YOU BEAUTY: Keen young angler Archie and his dad, Dave Donnelly walked the Kiewa River at Mt Beauty recently, with Archie landing this ripper on a gold vibrax. It measured 45cm and was in good condition. It was released.

G’day fishos. Come midnight Monday, it’s the end of trout season in both NSW and Victoria.

This means all proclaimed trout streams in both states will be closed while the trout do their thing.

Hopefully they will produce lots of little trout in the coming two to three months, depending on the state you’re in.

This doesn’t mean all waters are closed to trout fishing, though. 

About 99 per cent of lakes remain open, as are many of the lower sections of many different rivers and streams. 

There’s too many to mention here, so it’s best to check with your local tackle store, get on line or ring the relevant Fisheries department to find out which ones you can still fish.

Most streams performed pretty well this season, considering they’re still recovering from that absolute shocker we had three or four years ago when all streams seemed to be devoid of a decent trout. 

You can definitely see slight, steady improvement with each season.

Let’s hope we now get a decent drop of rain to keep that momentum going with a decent spawning run this year, which would really get us back on top of things.

Lack of rain to this point isn’t all that encouraging, but there’s definitely still time yet.

SUCCESS: Kylie Burt shows off a rainbow trout she caught out at Dartmouth. Don't forget you can send your pictures in to 0475 947 279 or 0475 953 605.

SUCCESS: Kylie Burt shows off a rainbow trout she caught out at Dartmouth. Don't forget you can send your pictures in to 0475 947 279 or 0475 953 605.

At A Glance

Dartmouth (88.2 per cent) – will be pretty busy this weekend.

Not only is it a long weekend, but the Dart Cup is in full swing.

Haven’t heard anything as yet, but all reports right up to the start of the comp on Friday were very positive so we should expect good numbers of both fish and fishos to be recorded. 

If you are planning a trip up there, don’t be afraid to take a couple of bubble floats and a shrimp trap. Catch a few gudgeons in the trap, using bread as burley, and slip them onto a very small hook (10 or 12).

If you drop them a metre or so under your bubble and get yourself into a quiet little bay, you should have no problems picking up a trout or two.

Streams – might get knocked around a bit by the rain, but most should still be worth a shot

If you find your favourite stream is up a little and a bit coloured, you may have to change tactics.

I’ve always found drifting a worm unweighted in coloured water the best technique of all. 

Hume (37 per cent) – has been pretty ordinary, but there is light at the end of the tunnel.

I’ve had three reports of trout being trolled up in the past week or so. 

While not the sort of news to get you bouncing off the lounge and racing out there, it’s a positive and, as history shows, they usually only improve from this time on.

I did hear of a decent bag of 20 nice reddies this week though, all caught casting metal blades and another good bag caught jagging.

Both lots were from the Bowna end of the lake.

I actually went out and chased a few carp in that area on Sunday to use for cray bait.

They weren’t that easy to find, but I ended up with three. I’d forgotten how well those buggers pull.

Crays – have really been fantastic lately. 

We’ve had heaps of stories of fishos doing really well, and it’s hard to see that changing.

One thing I did discover during the week was that you can’t use redfin for bait for crays. I’m not sure why, but those are the rules I’m told.

Fish or fish carcasses of any other kind are OK, and are the best bait in my opinion, with liver being a great option if you can’t find any fishy stuff.

The successful stories we’ve heard are coming from Albury right through to Corowa and beyond.

It’s just a matter of getting your boat in, with the water so low.

Mulwala – has been a mixed bag with some great fish coming in, but not everyone’s been getting into them.

Trolling or casting spinnerbaits and hard bodies seems the go, but the biggest issue is getting a boat into the drink with recent photos of the yacht club ramp showing the end of the gravel below, still a fair way from the water – meaning you can’t get a boat in the lake.

Canoes and kayaks, or wandering around the edges in the mud, are about your only choices, although locals are hoping for a slight rise so boat access becomes available again. We’ll keep you posted.

Blowering – is kicking goals, with some decent cod coming in again this week. It would be a great alternative if you had been planning a Mulwala trip.