Safety's part of their DNA

ACROSS AUSTRALIA: The Wodonga-based Ron Finemore Transport employs more than 450 people, has a fleet of more than 225 prime movers and travels upwards of 50 million kilometres each year.
ACROSS AUSTRALIA: The Wodonga-based Ron Finemore Transport employs more than 450 people, has a fleet of more than 225 prime movers and travels upwards of 50 million kilometres each year.

It employs more than 450 people, has a fleet of over 225 prime movers and travels upwards of 50 million kilometres each year.

Wodonga-based Ron Finemore Transport (RFT) sure is leaving its mark across Australia.

RFT specialises in line-haul and inter-city freight solutions across four divisions: general, liquid, temperature-controlled and bulk transport.

Established in 2004, safety is in the company's DNA. For more than five decades, founder Ron Finemore has been a tireless advocate for improved road safety and truck driver training. He is chairman of the NSW Road Freight Advisory Council and an active member of NSW Road Safety Council.

RFT is committed to the safety of its people, takes pride in ensuring a safe and healthy work environment, and aims to lead the way in the road transport industry in terms of safety.

General manager Darren Wood said the company was constantly refining its health safety standards through best-practice operational systems, training, communication, fatigue management and accident prevention.

He said in addition, RFT maintained the truck fleet and some 400 trailers to the highest standard, and welcomed feedback from other road users about their drivers’ behaviour.

As part of the drive for safety, RFT installed Seeing Machines Guardian (driver monitoring) technology across its fleet.

Since installation, RFT’s key findings were that fatigue can happen any time, at any stage of the shift cycle, and can happen to anyone.

"Guardian has proved to be extremely reliable, accurate and a valuable tool in developing a robust and rigorous procedure to support fatigue events,” Mr Wood said.

"It has taken the perceived problem of fatigue and distraction from anecdote to data-driven proof and allows the company to thoroughly investigate every event to find its root cause.

"With this information management has been able to revise operational practices and, in so doing, mitigate the risk of future incidents."

Since March, RFT has been an integral part of the $6.5 million Advanced Truck Concept (ASTC), an Australian Government Cooperative Research Centre Project, which aims to reduce fatal truck accidents using technology to monitor driver behaviour and develop a better understanding of the role of fatigue and distraction.

The project involves collaboration between Seeing Machines (which provides Guardian), Monash University Accident Research Centre, Volvo Trucks and RFT.

“By participating in this study, we are helping to make Australian roads safer, for not only our drivers but all users of our roads," Mr Wood said.

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