Former New Zealand Test paceman Daryl Tuffey looks to rep coaching

Former Kiwi quick Daryl Tuffey debuted for the Border Bullets this season and has expressed an interest in coaching the team.
Former Kiwi quick Daryl Tuffey debuted for the Border Bullets this season and has expressed an interest in coaching the team.

The Border’s biggest name wants to coach.

Former New Zealand paceman Daryl Tuffey has indicated an interest at representative level, such as the now vacant Border Bullets job.

“It’s more probably giving back, especially at grassroots level,” he said.

“Obviously people did that for me coming through the ranks and I’ve gained a whole lot of experience.”

Since retiring from first-class cricket at the end of the 2011-12 season and moving to Australia the following year, he’s done coaching consultancy work with top Sydney outfits, Bankstown and Sutherland.

He understands, of course, he wouldn’t automatically be ‘gifted’ a job, just because of his name, but the association was excited when told of his interest.

“Absolutely, absolutely,” CAW chairman Michael Erdeljac enthused.

“We will look at our senior representative coaches in August and September.

“I just think though we’ve probably run our course with some of our (representative) players and we are looking at some new blood in a couple of positions.”

The Border Bullets, the association’s top outfit, won the inaugural NSW Regional Bash T20 final at the SCG two years ago, but has fallen to Wagga in two matches since.

Wodonga coach Robbie Jackson, who led the Bullets in those three campaigns, stood down in November.

Lavington coach and Albury-based Cricket NSW official Robbie Mackinlay will certainly fly the flag for his star recruit, raving about his impact with the Panthers.

“I’m not too much of a technical style coach, but obviously there is a need for that,” Tuffey said.

“It’s more about game plans and executing the skills that you have.

“Everyone is different, nobody bowls a cricket ball the same and bats the same, so it’s just letting guys evolve and adapt and steer them in the right direction in a positive manner.

“One of the biggest things in coaching is trust and getting the players to trust you, what you can bring to the table.”

Tuffey added he would love to see CAW players progress as far as possible.

At the moment, though, he’ll settle with coaching his son’s team.

“I’ve been coaching six and seven-year olds, I think Riverina senior cricket would be a breeze compared with Milo cricket,” he laughed.