Federation Council to consider making Rowers Park an alcohol prohibited zone on Australia Day

COROWA’S trouble spot on Australia Day could become an alcohol-prohibited zone as early as next year.

Sergeant Andrew Robertson from Corowa police is backing a booze ban in Rowers Park on Australia Day.

Sergeant Andrew Robertson from Corowa police is backing a booze ban in Rowers Park on Australia Day.

Federation Council on Tuesday is expected to kick-start the process of the consumption of grog being banned at Rowers Park between 6am and midnight on January 26 every year.

Sergeant Andrew Robertson said he was fully supportive of the move and said the situation had become increasingly worse in the last four years.

“We’ve got data from the last three to four years that shows Rowers Park on Australia Day is being used by young people to abuse alcohol, becoming heavily intoxicated, resulting in minor assaults and violence,” he said.

“It is getting worse.

“Rowers Park is an area we think should have families and not an area being abused the way it is with the mess and carnage left behind to follow up.

“We have extra police rostered and come out from Albury tasked specifically to that area.

“I am fully supported of making Rowers Park an alcohol prohibited zone on Australia Day only.”

Video emerged of a drunken brawl involving about 20 people at Rowers Park on Australia Day last year before another outbreak of trouble in January.

Albury experienced similar issues on Australia Day at Noreuil Park before a grog ban was introduced in 2008 and tightened three years ago.

Federation Council is also seeking to make Bridge Road between the Sanger Street roundabout and John Foord Bridge, including carpark,an alcohol free zone.

Council director Kristy Kay, in a report to be presented at Tuesday’s meeting, said the Rowers Park could only be implemented if there was sufficient evidence and incidents.

“To ensure community consultation and discussion with all key stakeholders it is proposed to commence the process as soon as possible,” she said.

“This will first include seeking any statistical or anecdotal evidence to support the need for the implementation of future zones from key stakeholder groups.

“A proposal for future alcohol free zones and prohibited areas will then be developed and this will be placed on public exhibition to ensure whole of community input.”

Any person observed to be drinking in an alcohol-free zone may have the alcohol in their possession immediately seized and tipped out or otherwise disposed of.